Mining threatens to pollute the Boundary Waters

When we’re canoeing, camping, fishing and hiking near the Boundary Waters, we’re all careful to leave the lakes and forest in the same pristine condition we found them.

So why would anyone allow a new, risky type of mining—called sulfide mining—in the area? Yet:

  • Out-of-state mining companies are already doing exploratory drilling right outside the Boundary Waters.
  • Runoff from this type of mining can pollute waters with sulfuric acid, heavy metals and mercury—killing fish and making water unsafe to drink.

We’re building massive public support to stand up to the mining industry and protect the Boundary Waters from sulfide mining. We’re asking President Obama to make sure we don’t risk it by allowing dangerous sulfide mining in the area.

Too important to risk

The Boundary Waters is one of the most amazing and pristine wilderness areas in the world, and the most special place in Minnesota.

But mining companies like Twin Metals are trying to conduct toxic sulfide mining right next to the Boundary Waters. Sulfide mines cause acid mine drainage, which could leach into the Boundary Waters watershed, threatening these pristine waters with sulfuric acid, heavy metals, increased mercury levels and other toxic pollution.

The Boundary Waters are too important to put at risk of this dangerous mining pollution. We can protect this Minnesota treasure by not allowing toxic sulfide mines near the Boundary Waters, but the mining companies are using their political influence and deep pockets to try to fast-track mine proposals.

Together, we can win

Members and supporters like you make it possible for our staff to do research, make our case to the media, testify in St. Paul and Washington, D.C., and demonstrate the public support necessary to deliver the protections we need for places like the Boundary Waters.

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